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Signs Your Dental Crowns Don't Fit

Signs Your Dental Crowns Don’t Fit

Your dentist may recommend placing a crown on one of your teeth. This is most often done because there is not enough tooth remaining to hold a filling or the tooth has been weakened by previous fillings, cracks etc that put the tooth at risk of fracture which may render the tooth un-restorable and require an extraction. Crowns are made of gold or metal alloys, all porcelain or porcelain gold combinations. There are pros and cons with each choice of material and your dentist can review them with you and give you his/her recommendations.

The “fit” of a crown is very important for the longevity as well as the “comfort” and esthetics of the crown. In most cases, patients won’t be able to discern just how well a crown fits and one has to trust their dentists’ judgment, but the following lists a few things that may give you some indication.

The Right Dental Crown

To make, fit and insert an ideal dental crown, it takes a combination of material science, clinical and technical skill, physics, mechanics and engineering, teeth, tissue health, physiology and biocompatibility, and art. If any of these are not ideal then the longevity or success of a crown may be compromised. Fortunately, dentistry has had over 100 years of scientific studies, experience, and history of crowns that problems are minimized and most crowns will give many years of use.

As mentioned above, it can be very difficult to tell if your crown is “top notch” however if you experience any of the following issues there may be some things that need to be remedied with your crown:

#1: Your Crown Is Loose Or Keeps Falling Off

An ideal crown will have adequate length, size and shape of the tooth underneath. The fit of the crown to the tooth will provide a firm and solid seating for the crown itself.  The crown will typically feel “solid” when fully seated and will not come off easily once it is cemented. If you are having issues with crowns falling off it could be due to a lack of tooth structure, the shape of the tooth, or fit of the crown.

Almost all crowns are cemented or bonded, and after many years (5-20+years) the cement can wash out and cause the crowns to fall off. Under these circumstances, the fit of the crown is generally not a problem. And unless some of the underlying teeth have broken or become damaged, you probably will be able to have the same crown re-cemented.

#2: Your Bite Doesn’t Feel Right

A proper bite feels natural and comfortable, but what does that really mean? Essentially you should have solid contact with your teeth on both sides of your back teeth, with some (although possibly lighter) contact on the front teeth. A crown should not affect the contact you have with your other teeth unless there has been a specific purpose with that in mind. Therefore, when you chew it should feel like it was always there, it should be comfortable and not give you any discomfort to chewing. Keep in mind that sometimes a new crown can feel “different” much like a new pair of shoes, however, those feelings are usually minor and go away within a matter of days or one week.

#3: There Are Gaps

Gaps between your crown and adjacent teeth can lead to nuisance problems like trapped food which can lead to tooth decay, gum problems and even bad breath. A poorly fitted crown won’t fit tight enough to close the contacts between teeth. Ideally, this space should be such that floss will pass with some resistance but not so tight that the floss keeps breaking or shredding. If you notice any gap irregularities, go to your dentist to get the situation investigated and resolved.

What Do You Do If You Notice A Bad Fit?

If any of these issues arise with a brand new crown, most likely your dentist will notice it and make corrective steps or adjustments before you are even aware. However, if you are having any issues with a new crown make sure to go back and notify your dentist of the issues and concerns.  

If this is a problem that develops on a crown that has otherwise been good for many years, it could be that something has broken, shifted or changed. Make sure to see a dentist soon to see if the problem can be fixed, and to prevent any further problems in the area. If your crown has come off take the crown with you as it may just be a simple matter of cleaning the crown and re-cementing it. 

Come On In

At VCCID we want your crowns to feel completely natural in your mouth. If you think you might need your crowns adjusted, contact us, or comment below and we will do our best to answer you promptly!

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127 thoughts on “Signs Your Dental Crowns Don’t Fit”

      • Hi I got my crowns in Munich front teeth about 4 years ago. I have a nail Bitting habit and after bitting my nails my teeth ( crowns ) feel a little uncomfortable. Is this bad??

        Reply
        • Your front teeth should not feel uncomfortable, whether they have crowns or are simply natural teeth. It would be wise to have the teeth checked to ensure that ou do not have any problems developing.
          Sincerely
          Dr Balogh

          Reply
        • Hi Steven

          The first thing to check is the bite and make sure it is not heavy in centric or excursions….ie as you move from side to side. Clenching cold also be a contributor. This is assuming the crown fits well and there is no decay, open margins etc.
          Sincerely
          dr balogh

          Reply
    • I just got a new
      Molar crown and now my front teeth dont touch. Also when I slide my jaw left to right the new crown stops me. The dentist said.let it settle in and didn’t want to grind any more off. Help?

      Reply
      • Hello Diana:
        It is possible that a tooth will adjust however without seeing the situation, and based on your explanation only I feel that the tooth will need to be adjusted. I could be wrong without seeing the clinical situation so always hesitant to be contrarian to what your dentist has determined…nevertheless if it continues beyond a week or two speak to your dentist about it.
        Sincerely,
        dr balogh

        Reply
  1. I just got a new crown that when I bite down doesn’t make contact with the tooth below it. I said something to my dentist and he said oh the tooth below it will creep up and eventually make contact with that crown. That doesn’t seem like it would be very good for my tooth. What would you do if you were me?

    Reply
    • Hello Ruth:
      Your dentist is correct in that teeth will erupt until they make contact with the opposing tooth. How fast this occurs varies from person to person. However ideally the bite should not be too low…if it is truly minor it should not be a bad thing and would not even be noticeable except that your teeth eventually begin to contact. Im guessing that your crown is now cemented permanently and that is why your dentist suggested waiting for it to erupt…alternatively if you have failing on the tooth above (and assuming the difference is indeed small) it may be possible to add some material to the filling. I know it is not ideal, but it may be simpler option to removing and remaking the crown and faster than waiting for the tooth to erupt.
      \sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  2. Hi I have recently had my front teeth crowns replaced my dentist was able to fit one as the other one had a big gap at the side at the top & crossed over my other tooth at the side of it at the bottom of the tooth.. the one that she has fit seems to be to long & looks protruding, as it’s irritating the inside of my bottom lip to the extent my lip is swelling & feels lumpy.. & when my mouth is closed my bottom lip sticks out more than my top lip . My old crowns was never like this they didn’t protrude out & wasn’t as long. But the dentist that is fitting these said that they are right & that my mouth will get used to them.. I can’t see how as the discomfort that this one crown she has fitted is causing so much discomfort to my bottom lip.. I dread the other one when it comes back from the lab going on as to how that’s going to fit. Could you please tell me what would be the cause of this problem i’am having with these new front teeth crowns. Thank you

    Reply
    • Hello Denise: It sounds as though your new crowns may be more appropriate with respect to size and esthetics, however you probably have a deeper overbite such that the teeth press into your lower lip as you close. Some options…if the final crowns are the same and you like the look of them, have your dentist put them in with a soft cement so that they can be removed if necessary. If minor, it may be that you will become accustomed to them. If it feels really “bad” then your dentist may need to adjust the length right away. And if they are put into place, yet you still feel uncomfortable after several weeks then the length of these new crowns may have to be adjusted further to accommodate your bite and lip position so that it does not press into your lip. some adjustments can still be made after they are put in permanently but in case they need to be sent back to the lab it is better if they are not cemented permanently.
      Sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  3. Hello. I recently had a crown put in a and while the temporary one as on everything was fine. Once the permanent one was place I began to experience discomfort. A few adjustments later my dentist decides I may need a root canal. I go see a specialist and end up getting a root canal. 3 weeks later my I am still having problems, my whole bottom left side hurts. I’ve gone back to my dentist whom evaluated me once again and now she thinks I need a wisdom tooth pulled from my LEFT TOP!! The crown and root canal are in the left bottom. I am in constant discomfort and some pain at times. I need advice.

    Reply
    • Hello Cristela:
      It is difficult to give you good advice without knowing a lot more information. Unfortunately it is not totally unusual to have a tooth become symptomatic following dental work. Often teeth that require crowns do so because they have very large and extensive fillings. Although most of these teeth are fine after placing crowns on them, some may be “touchy” in that just one more procedure (filling, crown etc) causes the tooth to become inflamed to the point where a root canal is necessary.

      I have to assume that the initial diagnosis of your pain and the necessity of a root canal is correct. Your current pain could be from the upper wisdom tooth as we sometimes see pain being referred to the opposing jaw. why that has has become an issue now is really difficult to ascertain…is it some sort of correlation or simply coincidence? However…before proceeding with the extraction it would be wise to verify that it truly is the current source of pain. Have your dentist verify it isn’t a bite, TMJ problem or simply lingering discomfort form the root canal.
      Sincerely,
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
      • I have a screwed retained crown placed after an implant on a back molar. However I noticed there’s a tiny gap between the crown and the gingiva, floss can go through till the middle. Is this normal? Thanks

        Reply
        • Hello Judy
          This gap is not a problem….the main concern is creating an area that can be kept clean, does nt impact a lot of food and that the tissues stay healthy
          Sincerely
          Dr balogh

          Reply
  4. I just had a perm crown placed on my upper tooth, 2nd in from the back. At first I had discomfort when I bit down, I went back and he filed down and adjust it.
    I don’t have pain, but I do have discomfort. I can feel the crown, it’s rounded and feels too big. My dentist said I will adjust to it, that he made it the same size as the tooth behind it, but I thought I wouldn’t notice it at all, and now it’s all I feel/think about. It’s too wide and is driving me nuts! Is it wrong to complain? I hate that I paid over $2,000 for dental work and have to live the rest of my life like this! I’d rather have it taken out and just be toothless and comfortable than this!

    Reply
    • Hello Monica: In my opinion you are both correct. When we have a new crown, filling etc sometimes the tiniest difference feels like something huge and of course our tongue often won’t leave it alone. In most cases with a little time (1-3 weeks if not days) we do become accustomed to the new restoration and no longer notice it.

      On the other hand, I have had patients say the same thing to me, sometimes after persisting for several weeks. IN many of those cases the restoration certainly did not look big or out of place. In others I have even been able to remove the crown and actually measure it and it still did not seem big. Nevertheless my patient(s) was insistent that it didn’t feel right. the first couple of times this has occurred I was surprised to find that what appears to be the slightest change can sometimes feel like a major difference! So bottom line…I listen to what my patients are telling me that they are feeling even if it sometimes does not make sense.

      And on another note…I do have some patients whom I know from experience are extremely aware and sensitive to any change. One in particular is also very understanding and patient as we make adjustments…and we can both jokingly agree that she is my “princess and the pea” patient!

      One observation that may help your dentist identify the problem is to describe how you feel the discomfort. Is it when you eat and chew, as you bite, or is it simply the feel of the tooth, and if so what is it about the feel…you already mentioned it is too rounded and big, but to me that is something you would discern with your tongue and not so much as you eat.

      I hope this helps a little. Talk to your dentist…I’m sure he/she is just as motivated to find the solution and make things comfortable.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
      • Hello Dr. Balogh:
        I have the same problem described by Monica. My crown is on a premolar lower left side. After several days, my crown is pressing awfully on the gum, sometimes causing terrible pain when food gets squeeze between the new crown and the upper molar and ALL the time -being pressed right in the middle by a corner/edge by the upper tooth- causing pain and feeling too big, to the extent that it keeps other teeth from fitting properly where they usually go against the upper teeth, due to the crown’s size. If I press, I’m afraid the crown will come off or splinter, as it happened with a prior one that fits comfortably. I had a realization plaque made, but I cannot wear it cause the crown already causes terrible discomfort as it is. The doctor told me “you’ll get used to it, the lab made it with the exact impression we had taken of your mouth, it IS the tight fit”. She did ground it out a bit and warned me it couldn’t be done any further because “now the metal is showing a bit”. But it feels HUGE and painful. She said “come back in a week and worse comes to worst, we GROUND DOWN THE EDGES OF THE UPPER TOOTH. This makes me very concerned because that would weaken the enamel of a tooth that is in perfect shape and always has been and fit well with the prior crown and the original tooth. The tooth the crown is now replacing was damaged during a dental procedure bu a prior dentist, so I am now frightened the same could happen with the upper tooth if filed down to fit the crown. She said that because the crown is now cemented, it cannot be worked on any longer. Is it normal to modify my upper tooth to fit the crown? Wouldn’t that weaken its enamel and structure? The enamel is a very thin layer, isn’t it? I’m travelling for over a year the day after I see her next time and I won’t have access to insurance for teeth procedures while abroad. What’s the right thing to do with this crown? should I let the doctor grown down the upper tooth? I cannot tolerate the discomfort and pain the crown is causing (which the temporary crown did not)
        Thanks in advance for your advice.

        Reply
        • Hello Elle

          We generally have 2-3mm of enamel on a tooth, assuming it has not been worn down over time. IN some cases it is advisable and may make sense to adjust an upper tooth….however usually only if the adjustment is minor <0.5 mm and will not affect the strength or integrity of the tooth. Otherwise the filling/crown/dental work should be adjusted. Although your dentist took records and the lab fit the crown to the models, there are several reasons why a crown may still come back “high” in occlusion/bite. If this is the first tooth that makes contact when you bite, or if it feels like you bump into it as you chew…then the bite is probably still too high. Sometimes when we take a bite record it is not the same as when we eat or when we are numb…so errors can and do occur sometimes for this reason as well as others.Definitely let your dentist know…Although they ground through porcelain, in my opinion if it truly is still too high then it needs to be adjusted further.
          Sincerely
          dr balogh

          Reply
  5. my crown seems to be tight, its been about 2 1/2 weeks since I had the perm crown put in ( please keep in mind I had a severe allergic reaction to the bonding cement and that took over a week to heal) so really its been only one week with no rash or swelling, however when I eat something it feels like pressure on my next tooth and gums and that pressue doesnt get relieved until I floss. Will my gums and tooth make way for the new crown? or should I go in and have it adjusted?

    Reply
    • Hello Brandy: Your teeth will adjust and the pressure should lessen, however in my opinion if this has not occurred within the first 48 hours then it should be checked and adjusted. The bite should also be checked….it may be that the bite is just off the tiniest bit such that when you eat you put more pressure on the area.
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  6. I had a broken infected molar a few years back that had to have an extensive root canal and then a crown. The crown has never felt right and the dentist had filed the crown down on numerous occasions. You can tell the bite is off because the top veneer had eroded within the first 6 months of having the crown in place. Now I am noticing a bit of throbbing and a purple ring around the base of the crown. Could this be an infection ?

    Reply
    • Hello Heidi: The fact that you have throbbing is indicative of infection and/or inflammation. My first guess is that there may be a crack/fracture somewhere in the root. Cracks can be very difficult to identify and diagnose. IN some cases a person may present with a toothache requiring a root canal, and yet after the root canal the tooth continues to have some symptoms. Later diagnosis sometimes confirm a root fracture…and when I have seen these scenarios I suspect the root fracture was in fact the initial problem. The root fracture in these cases is what likely caused the initial pain/symptoms and because of the fracture the symptoms did to fully subside.
      sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  7. I have a new crown in the back of my lower right jaw that is alone. The wisdom tooth is gone and the two teeth before it are gone. All teeth are in the upper right side are in place so when I bite down the crown does not make contact with the adjacent teeth above. The crown slides to the right when I chew, it makes little contact with the the top tooth. Will I ever chew normally on the right side?

    Reply
    • Hello Malana: To truly function well on your right side it will be important to replace the missing teeth in front of your molar.Studies have shown that we tend to function mostly on on first molar and the two bicuspids in front of it. About 15-20% four chewing occurs on our second molar, and very little to none on our third molar (wisdom tooth).Your comment that the crown slides to the right as you chew makes me think that your bite may be off…if soaking an adjustment to the bite will certainly help. Replacing those missing bicuspids could potentially be done with either a partial denture, fixed bridge supported by the natural teeth or possibly implant.
      sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  8. I liked that you explained that it would be smart to pay attention to how the crown feels when you are biting down. That is good for me to know because I will need to get some new crowns put on this year.

    Reply
  9. I have a new crown on implant done 6 weeks ago and for first two weeks it was okay but then I started clenching my back teeth during night. I paid closed attention started avoiding clenching back teeth but with in a days I noticed that bites were off. My front teeth will come contact first and back teeth will not. At the time of installing crown my dentist noticed that crown was little tight and three was no space in between teeth but he mentioned that I will create a space by pushing other teeth. I believe it happened as i noticed by flossing that floss will go in and out which wasn’t a case on day 1. My current situation is that my bites are off and I clench my front teeth and my Jaw is sore. I went to see him today and he suggest that we should push front teeth little out so that your bite is corrected. When i mentioned him that it all happened due to crown he suggest we can take it out and see how it feels and then we can grind and put it back. My question is will my teeth come back to original position in weeks on removing crown and if it improves we can put crown back after grinding and sanding to make it small? Or should I get my teeth pushed out to adjust my bite ? He also suggested mouth guard but I am trying to resolve the real issue then preventive measures. Thanks.

    I look forward to your reply.

    Reply
    • Hello Harry:

      If it was a single corn you had done and since it has been a relatively short period of time, I would say removing the crown will allow the test to relax back into their original position. The only way to truly know is to try. I’m assuming your natural teeth shifted slightly because of the tight contact however that would normally not throw your bite off and create/start a clenching problem…so until the crown is removed you won’t know for sure. IF however that is the case the crown can be adjusted to make it fit more loosely and not =shift any of the adjacent teeth.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  10. I just recently had my two front teeth crowned due to an injury. My crowns leave a gap in between at the top and it allows air to be pulled through which is causing my lip to be sucked in and irritated. My dentist said it was necessary for flossing to have that gap and that the gum may fill in there but it hasn’t and the crowns feel completely unnatural and my whole upper gums are hurting now. I also notice that my tongue presses up against the back of my teeth now and I can’t control it. Will this go away,It’s been several months, or is it a bad fit? They look great though!

    Reply
    • Hello BoAnn:
      Since it has been two months I doubt that the space will fill in any more by itself….it sometimes can but will be complete within 1-3 weeks. You should ask your dentist if he/she can reduce the inside of the front teeth…that may help the feeling of your tongue pressing against them.Hope this helps a little
      Sincerely,
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  11. Ever since I got a crown on my second molar on the bottom right, my teeth have shifted, only on the side where the crown is and only effecting the bottom teeth. It was as slow shift, pushing the teeth forward, causing me to bite my lip daily until they shifted enough where my bottom canine tooth is now in front of my top teeth. This took a few years and was a slow shift, but I’m wondering if the crown is too big, and is it possible to grind it down in the hopes of giving my other teeth more room. Otherwise, I am looking at braces to put my teeth back where they belong. Maybe I should just have the tooth pulled.

    Reply
    • Hello Tracey

      There are several reasons why you bite has changed and teeth have shifted. Although it is not impossible for one tooth to cause some minor shifting, I would say one tooth generally will not cause a big shift in ones bite. In ortodontics often 2-3 teeth are solid enough anchors to move a single tooth, so for one tooth to move 3-4+ others seems unlikely. ON the other hand there are changes that occur with time to our teeth that causes our bites to change and hence teeth to shift.
      Sincerely,
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  12. Hi i had a crown put in at the front about 10years ago, its in good condition and feels great, only thing is that its a little smaller than my other tooth next to it. I have moved cities so i dont want to go to a dentist and get a new crown as my pain threshold is really high, and also scared incase he doensnt do it right. All i want to ask is isit possible for him to make it a little bigger without removing it or will i need to get a new one put in to make it bigger 🙁

    Reply
    • Hello Maria

      most likely you would need to have there crown removed and a new one made…however it probably can’t be made bigger in width if the space is not there, nor in length if your bite does not allow for it…that is without doing other (minor) changes…best to bring this up to your dentist and ask them what can be done to make the improvements.
      Sincerely,
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  13. Hey there
    I had a crown placed a week ago and now am experiencing facial swelling and swelling behind the right ear. The crown still doesn’t feel quite right. Are crowns removable ?

    The dentist put me on antibiotics and is saying he may have to do a root canal.
    Also the tooth next to it has a cavity
    I had an X-ray some of both teeth done a few days ago and he sajd that the root nerve of the tooth does not look infected.
    What could be going on ?

    Reply
    • Hello Melissa:

      If the crown was cemented with a permanent cement they usually are not removable without damaging the crown or tooth underneath. Hence if a root is required, usually a small hole is made to gain access for the root canal…although we don’t like to do this for brand new crowns, sometimes teeth do become infected and makes this necessary. Usually the crown can still last just as long as if the access for the root canal was never done.

      Without seeing you it is difficult to say if your swelling is due to infection, and whether this is from the tooth or something else. Usually if it is the tooth, the tooth is painful, sore to bite, loose, and changes are noted on the X-ray etc. Another possibility is a blockage or issue with your parotid gland as it is positioned in this area…if this gets worse after eating it could be a blockage of one of the duct.
      Sincerely
      dr Balogh

      Reply
  14. I just had a permanent crown cemented on to #5 tooth. After the numbing wore off, I could feel the crown against the inside of my mouth/lip. I felted it compared to the matching tooth on the left side and it feels as if the crown is protruding , it does not feel or look like it was put in there sideways or crooked but it feels like it. The side of the crown that rubs against the inside of of lip is not flat, it’s almost has a what feels like a triangle ridge that protrudes out. It doesn’t hurt, yet, but it feels very odd and noticeable. Should I get this removed and replaced? Or wait to see if I get used to it. I don’t want it to cause damage later.

    Reply
    • Hello Jaime
      It may be that the size and shape of the crown is slightly different than what you had before….it can be like anything new and different…a new pair of shoes etc. However if it continues to feel big or unusual after a week or so, speak to your dentist about it. I have been surprised how sensitive some people are to the most minor changes in their mouth….a minor adjustment to the shape/length of the crown can make a big difference.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  15. I had all 6 front crowns made twice! They cause so much discomfort as they produced an overbite and hit my loser lip and misaligned my mouth and changed the shape of my mouth.. 4 years of this and I am going crazy! Afraid to have them all redone again , but hate they way they feel and look!!! Any suggestions??

    Reply
    • Hello Susan
      If they are hitting your lower lip then my first guess is that they are too long…it may even be possible to do a small adjustment to your existing crowns to make them look and feel better. If you do decide to go ahead with new crowns on the front, you need to make sure your dentist understands your concerns and can also see and identify the problem. Waxing up the teeth to the final size and shape will be important so that the temporary crowns that are made can be made as ideally as possible. Then if these are perfect (or not) the changes can be easily made and then the exact size, shape, length etc can be communicated to the lab tech/ceramist
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  16. Hi, a quick question i recently had a front crown put in. I’m overly anxious patient and do get very paranoid over my teeth before I begin. i had it done 6 weeks ago. I’m not in pain i can eat comfortably my front 6 teeth still feel unusual (not feel the same before the crown) i feel silly as i don’t have any symptoms at all. is this normal or should they feel just like they did before i had the crown? how long before they feel the same again?

    Reply
    • HI Abby
      If you only had one crown done, your other teeth should feel the same. If you had several front teeth done, they might feel different at first if the size, shape or length is slightly different, even though they may look good and otherwise be comfortable. In most cases any differences that are noticeable disappear within days or even a couple of weeks.Seeing that 6 weeks have now gone by…there maybe some minor differences that you are having difficulty adjusting to. My recommendation is to explain this to your dentist…I have seen this before and it is surprising how a minor change can make a big difference for some people.
      Sincerely,
      dr Balogh

      Reply
  17. I had crowns placed on 4 top front teeth. The crowns are larger than all my other teeth and protrudes out. They look like 4 false teeth, I am 43 yrs old, what needs to happen to fix it. They were placed with soft cement to see if I could get used to them.

    Reply
    • Hello Nataliey;

      Th good thing is they are in with a soft cement…your dentist should be able to remove them and have them modified. Sometimes it is easier to make a set of temporary acrylic crowns and have the patient wear them for a few days to a week. Once they are acceptable wrt comfort, bite, eshtetics etc then a mould can be made from them and sent to the lab to duplicate the size and shape.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  18. Hi there I have had a root canal back In November had to wait to get the crown on until February.. When I got the temporary crown on it felt funny felt pressurized and my bite felt weird they said the bite was to high and adjusted it. When the temp was readjusted after a Second visit it didn’t feel pressurized I was scared to go back because it was just feeling better… when I got the permanent crown on something felt off about it. I stated before I left that day it felt funny they said it’s because it was a different material. I waited two weeks and it still felt funny pressurized and was biting my cheek. Went back in they drilled some of it off.. now I don’t but my cheek but it still feels pressurized. Now they want to do antibiotics and go from there. Should I get another opinion or see what they are going to do? I feel it’s maybe up to high

    Reply
    • Hello Tiffany: The first thing your dentist should check is the bite…and it sounds like that is what they did. It may be that another adjustment is still needed, however if it continues to feel uncomfortable after the bite adjustment is confirmed to be 100%, you may need to have the root canal evaluated for further…it could be residual inflammation or infection or even possibly a crack in one of the roots. Your dentist will be able to go through a checklist of possibilities and rule things out
      sincerely,
      dr Balogh

      Reply
  19. Dear Dr Balogh,
    I think it’s wonderful that you answer all these questions! That is very selfless!
    About 11 years ago, I had a 3 piece crown placed over one of my front teeth and over one canine . The lateral incisor was missing. It finally needs to be replaced as my gum line has shifted (or receded?). I don’t have any issues with it just yet. I never liked the look of this crown. It is bulky, and does not look that nice. (Others say it looks fine, but I don’t like it). The dentist who did this crown said he didn’t want to shave down my teeth anymore because it could create sensitivity and possibly lead to a root canal. That was why he said the crown was bulky. Now that it will be replaced, I want to be confident about my smile. Will shaving down the teeth more create problems inevitably? Or is there a way it can be done right?

    Reply
    • Hello Sara:
      Your dentist was probably correct and wise in being conservative…yes sometimes a tooth is bulky and in order to make it a more normal size it requires greater preparation…this can lead to sensitivity or root canals. However now that you have had a cron in place for 11 years, it could be that the nerve has retracted and it may be possible to reduce the tooth further. Ask your dentist if it can be improved and what nay concerns he/she may have regarding the nerve/root canal
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  20. Hello. I recently had 11 of my front teeth waxed so I can have crowns and “Better smile” . I dont have any pain and I was able to talk normal with the Temproraries. Once my permanent Crowns came and the Dentist placed them I had the feeling that my tounge was trying to reach them and the were going too far out. I also noticed that the 3rd crown on the left wasnt like the the 3rd on the right and was kinda sliding out. My point is isn’t they supposed to be straight? I had really straight teeth before. I also wasnt able to say “s, sh”.I told my Concerns the Dentist and he said that if we sent them to the lab back we dont know if they gonna be worse . He gave me one week to think and accept or reject the crowns and only temprorary cement them. When I brushed them I felt they were too far out for me ( like sticking out). Well I still dont know what to do because the second day 2 of the crowns fell off and I went to the office and they put the temproraries back because I didn’t want them to fall while I am at work. Now it the temproraries I can perfectly talk , no tounge issues and feel that crowns are just on a place and straight. Tomorrow I have to be at office to tell him my decision and I still dont know what to do.Please help

    Reply
    • Hello Lina: May apologies for not being able to replay immediately….you sent your question last week and I am still getting caught up after being on holiday.Sometimes even the slightest change in size, shape can make a tremendous difference to the look, feel or even speech….so if you already have the crowns inserted permanently your dentist may still be able to fix whatever is causing concern. BTW, whenever I am doing cosmetics or full mouth reconstruction, after placing the temporaries I follow up with the patient 3-5 days later and more if necessary. During these appointment I check the esthetics, feel, bite, comfort and speech etc. If anything needs changing it is easy to do at this stage. Once perfected or closely enough, I send photos and models of the teeth to the ceramist so that they can then duplicate exactly what is required….thereafter if any adjustments are need it is usually very minor. I know being told this technique Amy not be helpful to you now…but hopefully for anyone else undergoing a similar procedure they may discern some useful information from this.
      Sincerely,
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  21. This has been very informative, but still havent seen an answer to what i have been looking for. So, here goes. Recently had a crown done lower left, very back molar. Temporary popped off twice and when the permanent was placed it popped off as well. Finally got it seated, and within a week started having alot of pain. Back to the dentist for bite adjustment…the first of three times. Everytime I go into the dentist, xrays are done and adjustments made. Still in pain, and this trip the deision was made to just extract the tooth. What a nightmare. Here is my newest concern, in addition to the crown charges, I have been charged more than 1700.00 in fees to “adjust” my bite along with the xrays every trip, and every trip to replace the crown, and am now being charged for the extraction. Is it customary to charge to rectify problems associated with services already rendered?

    Reply
    • Hello Angela:
      Technically your dentist is within his “right” to charge you for the various appointments. Here in Canada where we have universal health care for medical procedures, the doctors and hospital bill for every step and procedure that is done….so if we consider that as a standard then every procedure is potentially a billable procedure. However, in dentistry each office or doctor will make his own decision on not only how much to charge for services but also whether to charge for certain services. On the other hand, here in BC our dental body specifies that any adjustments required to a newly placed filling, crown or denture, when done within the first few months, should be included as part of the cost.
      Hope this helps a little
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  22. Hello there
    I had an extraction of a tooth at that time I had a crown next to the tooth that was extracted. The dentist cracked my crown and said he would replace it. I went in a few days later and they fitted a crown for me and cemented it in the same day. I kept telling them my bite feels off. They shaved down the crown a bit and had me bite down on some paper a few times. Then they said that my mouth was still swollen and in a few days it will feel better and adjust. Well a week later it isn’t better. When I bite down all I feel is the crown and it hurts. My right side bottomed had so much pressure. I’m not sure if it’s the crown or the extraction . Either way I can’t chew anything. Let me add something on the other side of my mouth the tooth opposite of the crown is missing. So not sure if that is an issue too. All I know is the crown when I run my tongue on the back feels sharp .I hate it and I’m in a lot of Pain. I’m scared it’s perm cemented In. What do you suggest I say when I go see them? How much of a crown can be shaved off,m

    Reply
    • Hello Loretta:It sounds as if your bite is till too high. since you had a crown there before there should be enough material to adjust it further, however it may depend on the choice of material that was used. Secondly the sharpness is probably due tot he adjustments that were made…this should be easy to polish and make smooth.
      Sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
      • Hi Dr Balogh. I had two crowns done yesterday (on #17 & #18). Both had large amalgam fillings from years ago and both teeth had tiny fractures around the top so my dentist recommended having them crowned before bigger issues arose. I had no pain in either one of the teeth and now after the crowns, I still have no pain (no root canal done on either) which I feel blessed about. Some biting adjustments needed to be made yesterday before I left the office. My Dentist used CEREC, so I was fortunate to only need one visit. However, when I bite down today (day after the procedure), I think I am feeling the crown putting pressure on the gum underneath when I bite down. Is this possible and is this normal? Will this improve over time? It doesn’t creat any pain…only the sensation that the bottom of the crown is pushing against my gum? (Odd, I know) My dental office is closed today so naturally I am searching online to determine if the sensation is normal this early after the procedure. I believe I am only feeling #18 creating this “gum pressure” and not 17. Do you have any experience with this complaint/sensation from other patients? Thanks so much.

        Reply
        • Hi Andrea

          Go back to your dentist and have them check the bite…it doesn’t sound like anything serious at this point.
          Sincerely
          Dr Balogh

          Reply
  23. Hello
    Thank you for this opportunity to ask for more advice. I have gone to my dentist for over 40years. I have never really had issues until these last two crowns were placed. The temporary was not covering my whole tooth and needed to be resized. Now the permanent is in and does not feel like a good fit. The temp was my top tooth. The permanent issue is my bottom tooth under the gum. The problem is that when I floss it flosses my under tooth. Then I feel there is a gap that catches food crumbs. I went in to see the assistant because my dr is almost retiring so he is gone a lot. The first assistant that measured my tooth is not the same assistant I have now. The second assistant is the one that helped me with my temporary tooth. Now she stated I flossed to deep. Ok but if not then food remains in my new pocket under the gum. I can understand not flossing deep. I appreciate the fluoride she placed as I feel there is a slight layers of protection. However I am concerned will my gum grow back in connection with this new crown and tooth. I also feel the crown was a tight fit. I heard the dr. say that is not going anywhere. It will be easy to floss in between the teeth here. Are they dismissing me verses dealing with their mistake. The First Assistant was the one that measured my deeply placed crown. Will this problem fix itself? I am concerned I will get a deep cavity under the gum where the food catches. They said regular brushing, flossing, and visits would keep that from happening. Are they in denial? Will a water pick keep the tooth protected. Would it be better to raise a bigger fuss and have them fix the situation? I am filled with questions.
    Thank you for being willing to offer advice.
    Hope to hear your thoughts.
    Sincerely

    Reply
    • Hello Michelle: You raise a lot of good questions but I is difficult to say whether the fit is good or not without seeing the situation clinically. The contacts between the teeth should be rather tight…enough resistance that it prevents food from getting pushed n between the teeth but not so tight that the floss tears or shreds. You may have had some bony changes such that the gums have shrunk, creating a space below the contact point between the teeth. sometimes this area cn be closed by over contouring the crown a bit, but once agin we have to be careful not to overdo it or it becomes a food trap that is not cleansable. BTW….the fluoride will not help with the gap, only too help remnineralize the enamel. A water pick will definitely help to clean areas that even floss may not reach….if you feel your contacts are not tight enough or the amount of food that is getting trapped is excessive, best to bring it up to your dentist. Once again, without seeing the clinical situation it is impossible to determine if your situation can be improved….sorry.
      Sincerely,
      dr balogh

      Reply
  24. Many thanks for you kind efforts here. I have a gold crown on my top left, the one in front of the molar – number 15 if I counted right. This tooth was filled many times which caused lots of pain during and after recovery. I agreed to get the crown thinking the pain would finally be over but it wasn’t. For a few years after the crown was done I had to warm the water in my water pik, the cold water caused a sharp pain. Eventually it felt OK but lately it’s been causing discomfort. My dentist adjusted the bite which has helped but if I chew on that side I do get some pain and discomfort. I always thought the fit could be better. I can feel a bit of a gap where the crown meets the tooth. It’s not loose and it feels like the gap is just around the outside perimeter. I can feel it with my fingernail but it seems minor, maybe .5mm wide and .5mm deep. I get some sensation when I probe it with my fingernail. I asked my dentist about it when he put it on and he said, “There’s no gap.” Yes, it was done a good number of years ago, maybe 8 or so and felt pretty good for a few years. Do you think this gap could be causing my discomfort and minor to moderate pain? Could obtaining a better fit reduce my pain and discomfort?

    Reply
    • Hello John; What you perceive as a gap is probably that the crown margin does not go below the gum line, so you can see or feel the edge of the crown. Your dentist on the other hand is feeling to see if there is a gap between the crown margin and the inside of the tooth preparation.

      If you have some tooth (most likely root) exposed at the gum line it is usually not serious, although income cases the area could be sensitive to cold. The first thignto check is the bite, and to make sure there are no contacts on the cupsal inclines in centric or in excursions. Failing that some test that have had a a lot of trauma over the years (filling, cavities etc) may develop a chronic pulpits (inflammation) which does not go away…unfortuantely sometimes the only solution is a root canal!
      sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  25. Sir! I had a root canal treatment on my left side lower back tooth and got a crown placed over it. But it’s been more than 15 days I feel discomfort. I persistently think that the crown is too big and can cause asymmetry to my face or jaw. Is it like that?
    I could have left it without crown but now since it has been trimmed, But still I want to get it removed. Should I do that? I’m very bothered and not enjoying my life because of this crown. Please help me!

    Reply
    • It won’t cause assyymetry or anything serious, but since it is root candled ti should not be causing any discomfort…it could be the bite on the other hand there may be some more critical issues such as residual infection or a fracture in the root. Definitely go have your dentist reevaluate the bite and all aspects of the tooth.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  26. Hi Doc, I have a new crown in my #30 tooth and I’m having a very strange occurance, since it was placed. The fit seems correct and I have good space for flossing on each side but now each day after I remove my nightly retainer I feel constant pressure on #24 and #25 and by the end of the day they are out of alignment and shifting inward.
    My dentist said I now need a new retainer made since I have a new crown in #30.
    What are your thoughts?
    Thanks,

    Reply
    • it does sound like the retainer is causing the tooth to shift….it may be possible to adjust the retainer, but depending on how well it fits it might be better to make a new one.
      Sincerely,
      dr balogh

      Reply
  27. Hello there!!! So I had 8 crowns placed on my upper front teeth today, they did a wax build up a couple of months ago and when it came time to shave down my real teeth which were just unhealthy and damaged, they jailed the mold to make my temporary crowns and they looked FANTASTIC they were my teeth but better, exactly what I wanted, today I went to get my permanent crowns placed and when I was lying there with the mirror they looked fine (on nitrous as well as lorazepam) but when I stood up to go for a bathroom break AFTER they had been cemented in place I noticed they jut out REALLY far from my bottom teeth and are SULER long compared to my wax build up, my dr admitted they didn’t seem to be the same and filed them down a bit for me but they still seem long and they protrude SUPER far out giving me the appearance of an overbite which i have never had. I see him again in 3 days but I am really concerned, what can even be done at this point? They are cemented in!! My dr even admitted they looked a bit too far out, can they even take off a brand new crown and start over? Im devastated because ive waited so long to do this and I want to LOVE them for the price we paid for them!! Help would be so appreciated!! Thank you!

    Reply
    • Hello Rebecca

      It may be possible to adjust the existing teeth…sometimes even the slightest change physically can make a big difference to the looks. Worst case scenario, the crowns/veneers can be removed and remade.

      For some reason it appears the ceramist was not able to copy the wax up or temporaries as expected. Talk to your doc…it sounds as if he is alt least aware and also willing to fix things.
      Sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  28. Hi doctor! I recently (1 week) had a crown in last lower right molar and it left my bite “changed”. I trust my dentist when he uses bite check to say it appears ok, but I feel as though my right side contacts “too much” and my lwft feeling ‘gappy’ (not solid contact). He has already filed some off my top tooth and a bit off the porcelain itself. Is it just the change I cannot get used to or is it possible I am right and should keep asking him to adjust? My dentist is superb otherwise and I hate to be a nuisance (aka princess and the pea syndrome) but I am afraid to bite on that side!

    Reply
    • Hello June:
      Have him check it again…I have found some types of our bite paper t=do not mark as well…there are other factors….in some cases a persons proprioception is much more sensitive than any of our bite papers. Also there may be some mandibular flexure occurring, and therefore your bite may appear to be ok while sitting in the chair but then it changes as you bite and eat.
      sincerely.
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  29. I got a new crown and it doesn’t feel like my old tooth. It’s shaped differently and there is a slight overhang in the back and side.

    Reply
    • Hello Lena

      Make sure to ask your dentist to check it…it may just be small matter of adjusting and polishing the crown.
      Sincerely
      Dr balogh

      Reply
  30. Hello,
    I had a crown two months ago on my tooth 3, and I feel discomfort since I have it. While having the temporary crown I felt some pain. The X ray did not show any infection but he said he would send me to the specialist if I still feel pain. Right before he put the permanent crown I asked him if it was possible to have a root canal with the permanent crown and he said yes. After having the crown I still have pain and discomfort so he did some adjustment, but the discomfort was still there. He finally sent me to the specialist who told me that I had a space at the bottom of the crown that should not be there and that I will need a new crown. When I talked to the front desk receptionist of my dentist she said that it was my responsibility to make the decision of putting the crown having already concerns about the tooth, and she says I have to pay for the new crown, and at the most, they could charge me only the laboratory that make the crown. What can I do? I will appreciate any advice. Thank you

    Reply
    • HI Michelle

      I would say speak to your dentist as the front desk person might not truly understand the circumstances around this tooth. It would be one thing if your dentist said everything was fine and insisted to cement the crown permanently, versus if he/she was hesitant and the insistance to cement came from yourself….either way most dentists have their patients best interests at heart and I’m sure he/she will find an acceptable solution.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  31. About 7 weeks ago, I had a root canal in a tooth. A week ago, I had he permanent crown placed in. The next day I started feeling pressure on the tooth directly next to it and occasional pain (over time I noticed the pain seems to occur after I’ve eaten and will subside until I eat again). At first I thought my mouth just needed to adjust and I also had a sinus infection at the same time. But it’s been a week and it’s not getting better and the sinus infection is definitely gone. Could it be my crown is too tight?

    Reply
    • Hello Faye

      My first thought is the bite is off…have your dentist confirm that there is no heavy contact in your centric bite or excursions.
      Sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  32. Recently replaced my #11 crown replaced. My rootcanal had gone back so had to redo it. The doctor that did that shaved too much off my teeth and how the crown won’t have much to hold on too. He did z build up but it’s not really a tight fit and still feel like the crow is a little lose.

    1. What options do I have at this time?
    2. Since the new crown I always feel like there is something stock between my teeth and when I floss there’s nothing there and it’s making me go crazy.

    I would appreciate your feedback.

    Thank you for your help in advance.

    Reply
    • If too much tooth was reduced it may be possible to anchor a post into the root canal and rebuild the tooth…the critical part to get a good fit is to have at least 3mm of root surface at the gum line for the crown to properly hold onto the tooth. regarding the feeling of something being stuck…it sounds like something to do with the shape or fit of the crown…that may be fixable by doing some adjustments….check with your dentist
      sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  33. Hello Sir, I’m 24 years old and a couple of months back I got crowns fitted on two of my teeth (upper front incisors) by a dentist who specializes in crowns, In one of them I had a root canal done in childhood and the other one just had a filling, my primary motive to get the crowns was to change their colour as the one with the rct had turned yellowish and the other one’s filling looked like a white spot on an off white tooth, also the rct tooth was shorter than the filling one but that wasn’t a problem, now when I had my temporaries put on they sure looked bulkier but they were pretty straight like my natural teeth, however when the permanent crowns came the dentist had to decrease a little length of one of them and to round the corner a bit, after I got them fitted, what I noticed first was that they were directed outwards and even pushed my lip a little. Another with both the temporaries and the permanent has been that when I make an s sound it is accompanied by whistling which wasn’t previously there, I told this to my dentist before getting the permanent crowns, he said that it’ll be okay after sometime but it is still the same, also one of the crowned teeth doesn’t touch the lower incisor and I’m not able to bite off the dead skin of the lip from this tooth, and from the other crowned tooth also I can do it only with difficulty while previously I could do it with ease from both of them, the thing I’m most concerned about is the aesthetics of the teeth as they are directed outwards, and I also want to know if my lower incisor will grow up to touch the upper one, in that case even my lower tooth would not look good. What should be done? Would getting the crowns changed weaken my teeth further or predispose me to sensitivity and I also want to know how long can I wait to get whatever needs to be done because it’s been a few months back that I’ve completed my internship and right now I’m preparing for my specialty entrance tests.
    Thank You in advance

    Reply
    • Hello Doc:

      Sorry for the late reply…everything you mentioned…the look and feel of them pushed out, the sibilant “s” sounds and your inability to touch/bite edge to edge all have to do with eh size, shape and contour of the crowns. Some may be fixed with an adjustment..teh s sounds may need an adjustment to the lingual surface or the incisal edge…if these can’t be adjusted new crowns would be needed. The overall contour probably requires replacing the crown….best to speak to your dentist. He is right in that we often accommodate our speech to a new shape of tech, but if it does to occur within a few weeks I would say some modification is needed. When these are redone it would be ideal to modify the temps until they are as perfect as possible regarding all the above parameters….then an impression can be done and sent to the the lab so that they can copy the ideal shape.

      Hope this helps…best wishes for your exams!
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
      • Thank you so much for the help Sir,
        I just want to ask if I Can wait for a year to get this done, as currently I’m very short on time because of my preparation

        Reply
        • You should be fine to wait…the other thing one has to consider is when we are very busy/stressed we don’t heal well. so sometimes it makes sense to wait until we have a more appropriate time to proceed with dental work/surgery.
          Sincerely
          dr Balogh

          Reply
  34. Hello Doc Balogh,

    8 months ago I had a monolithic Zirconia crown cemented (with glass ionomer) on to my upper posterior tooth.
    I had some difficulties with the crown in the last months, specifically during chewing – the crown would sort of hammer my food into my lower natural tooth, instead of deflecting the food – and it seems it is due to the fact that the crown is not very contoured – cusps, grooves, etc. The crown was milled in a machine, and and no additional contouring work was done on it thereafter.

    As well, every time I flossed between the crown and my natural teeth, the floss seemed to get stuck on what felt like a crown margin sticking out. And my gums bled upon flossing.
    Recently I had been tasting a bad taste in my mouth, and just a few days ago, my crown popped out while cleaning my teeth.

    From what I described, what seems to be the issue/what would you suggest? And should a Zirconia crown be contoured and designed like the natural tooth – with grooves and well carved cusps, to ensure proper food deflection? (The crown is more marshmallow shaped than tooth shaped, and sides are roundish and short).

    Would very much appreciate your opinion.

    Reply
    • Hello Sarah: The contour on the biting surface is usually contoured…however it also depends on the opposing tooth. Over time we wear out teeth and they become more flat and less contorted…therefore if a crown is made it has to match the opposing tooth. regarding the contacts, contour etc the floss should not be catching or shredding, nor should the tooth impact food…and the shape of the tooth should feel “normal” to your tongue etc.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  35. Hello: Thank you for considering my question. One week ago I had a permanent bridge placed from my premolar right bottom side across a space from a missing tooth to the molar behind it. The molar part and the bridge part feel ok. The premolar part has a long part to cover recession on both the front and the back. It is fine at the front but the back digs into my gums and causes pain and constant discomfort. It is making me miserable even though I try to ignore it. Can a bridge be adjusted at or below the gum line? Also I can feel a sensation in this tooth every time I step down hard, not pain. Could this mean the crown is too high and not sitting down on my tooth properly?

    Reply
    • Hello Brenda:

      It sounds like the bridge needs to be adjusted…you should not feel discomfort as you bite down on the tooth. If the bridge is permanent(which should be the case) it may be difficult to adjust the tissue surface….although not impossible. Best to get the bite fixed first
      sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
    • Hello Brenda:If you feel discomfort with biting on the crown the most likely issue is the bite is high…this is easy to adjust. A fixed bridge should not dig into the gum tissue as they are permanent and once cemented cannot press into the gum any further…so this part is a little confusing. Nevertheless it probably can be adjusted if it truly is pressing into the gum tissue too much…you might just need some local anaesthetic to do it comfortably.

      Sincerely
      Dr balogh

      Reply
  36. Hi Doctor Balogh, I went to the dentist to get a new crown put on my front tooth because my current crown was 30 years old and it had discolored from the rest of my teeth which made me conscientious. He removed old crown, I wore temperary crown for around 7 days, then new crown was put on. Since having original crown removed I had minor pain which I thought was normal and if course would subside after new crown was put on, well it hasn’t. Dentist then decided I needed root canal, so I got that done. I’m still currently in pain. Like others have said, I feel the tooth is too big, meaning my tongue hasn’t got used it it and it’s been 2 months since root canal and almost 4 months since crown was replaced. When I touch that tooth I have a dull pain where dentist drilled. I also noticed a small gap (food hasn’t got stuck) where crown put in. I cab close mouth around it and blow out air? Dentist also made me a mouth guard which I’ve had for a week. It seems like its helped slightly but I just want pain to go away. Dentist has also done a few x-rays and showed me there is no infection or inflammation and the root canal looks good. What could this possibly be? Help? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Hello susan:

      since you said the crown felt big and that with the night guard the tooth is better, I wonder if there is an area where the bite is actually high. It may feel fine when you close your teeth, however as you slide your jaw forwards there may be an area where you actually put excess pressure on this tooth. That would make it sensitive, more likely to prompt the necessity of a root canal and also explain why it is still sensitive. Try placing your forefinger on the front surface of your tooth…then tap your teeth together and slide your lower jaw from side to side and from front to back. If you feel vibration or movement in your tooth the bite is high in some part of the crown.
      sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  37. Hello,
    I had two crowns, #14 and #15 placed last Friday. Right away I felt my bite was off and I was hitting hard on the teeth towards the front. (#’s 11,12,13) My dentist did some adjustments including grinding those teeth down and told me to call if I still had problems.

    I started chewing yesterday on the crowned side. (Sat) My bite feels off. I have to think about chewing. It feels like the teeth are hitting all wrong and almost empty towards the back. My muscles get sore as well. Now tooth # 13 is tender as well as #20. I did not have this problem with the temporary crowns or before.

    Does this mean the new crowns are too short/low? I do not want all my other teeth grinded down to fit the new crowns. Thank you.

    Reply
    • Hello Claudia: It sounds as if your bite is still off…although your dentist adjusted the crowns they may need further adjustment.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  38. Dr Balogh

    I had a tooth implant and new crown. When my dentist install new crown, he found the crown is too big to place in between my existing teeth. He said something wrong when taking impression. So, I always felt too high. After long hours fix, he finally place in and sent me home. Several things I noticed, first, the new crown compress my existing teeth so I feel hurts when I chewing food. Should I ask my dentist to take new impression and have a new crown?

    Thanks
    MIC

    Reply
    • Hello Mic: If the adjustment is minor, then a further adjustment would probably be the first thing to try. However if adjusting the crown compromises the esthetics, strength or integrity of the crown then in my opinion a new impression would be in order.
      sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  39. Hi Dr. Balogh,
    I had 3 crowns placed on my upper left molar implants 10 days ago, the doctor checked the bite and made adjustments, they felt very discomfortable and the doctor said to give 1 -2 weeks to get used to it. During the first couple of days, my lower left natural molars hurt really bad when I bite down and chew, after a week they got better, but now they still hurts a little bit when I chew , is this normal? Should I give it more time to adjust or there’s something wrong in here?

    Reply
    • Hello Fiona: It sounds like your bite was high…your natural teeth can and will adjust…how long it takes depends on how high the bite was in the first place. The fact that it is improving is a good thing, however if it still hurts to chew after even a few days I normally recommend having the crowns adjusted. If it is really minor you may wait a little longer…but if you cannot eat on that side after one to two weeks do not wait any longer.
      sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  40. Hi. I recently got temporary crowns set in . is it normal that they are bigger than what my original size teeth looked like.
    So one of the caps is like showing . when i smile. Only one tooth was removed but the one next to it was like shaved ..or thinned( im not sure how to explain. So when they put in the temporary ones ( on the side the tooth the tooth was extracted) it look pretty good even though its big. But on the side that was just thinned (the top part is protruding) when i smile my top lip gets stuck to one side cause it gets stuck in the between the part that is protruding. Does this mean my permanent crowns will look the same ?

    Reply
    • Hello Shrilyn: It is difficult to visualize exactly what you are seeing and feeling. However best to tell your dentist your concerns so that the information is relayed to the lab tech that is making the crowns. In some cases photographs and/or molds of the temporaries can be sent to the lab to show them what is specifically good/bad about the existing teeth/temporary crowns.
      Sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  41. Hi, I recently had 3 Zirconia crowns cemented on teeth #13, 14, and 19. #13 was cemented about 5 weeks ago and #14 and 19 were cemented 2 weeks ago. Those took longer because the first round that came from the lab were too bulky and were sent back. A new impression was taken because the lab said the bite was off and new crowns were made. The doctor said the new crowns were good and they were cemented on despite me saying they still felt bulky. She insisted they looked good and I just have to get used to them. #13 is fine but #14 and 19 feel horrible in my mouth. They feel too wide and rounded, nothing like my original teeth before. Every time I bite, i feel pressure and like it’s putting pressure on the gums surrounding it on the lingual side of the crowns. I have gone back multiple times to get the bite adjusted because it was too high at first but I still feel pressure when I bite. I’m scared to eat on that side because I don’t want to hurt the nerve any more and end up needing root canals. Is it possible I am right and the crowns are too wide and they are putting pressure on my gums?

    Reply
    • Hello Sandra
      It is not unusual for teeth to feel big especially when they have been missing for many months…our tongue and entire mouth gets used to the extra space., however in my opinion most people will become accommodated to the new teeth within a few weeks if not sooner. So if you still feel they are too wide they may need to be adjusted further. This can be done even if they are cemented in place. The pressure on the gums is odd since the crowns should not move once cemented…howeever there may be something regarding your bite and tooth contacts that still needs to be adjusted. Have your dentist check the bite again and speak to him about adjusting the shape as well.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  42. Hello Dr. Balogh,
    Seven years ago I had a root canal done on my tooth (#13) and had a porcelain crown placed and all seemed fine. Fast word to last month when my dentist tells me during a regular visit that I need a retreat on the root canal.
    I saw a specialist to treat the infection and redo the root canal, he said the original root canal did not go all the way to the tip of the root and showed me the before and after X-rays. When he was finished he told me I did not need a new crown and that I would just go back to my dentist to have a filling placed in the crown. This was excellent news to hear!
    Today my dentist office called me to say they DO want to do a new crown because on X-ray there is a space between my crown and gum.
    When I look at my tooth I do see a difference where the crown is and what I assume is my actual tooth before the gum begins but it has always looked this way and this is the first time any dentist has ever said it’s a problem.
    I don’t know if I should listen to the specialist or my dentist. Any advice?? Thanks 🙂

    Reply
    • Hello Lilly
      If there is a gap between the tooth and the margin of the crown then it should be replaced. However, if the gums have receded showing the margins fo the crown, or if it was done that way on from the beginning, yet the margins are still sealed (ie no gaps between the crown and tooth), and there is no decay or any other problem…then you may not need to replace the crown. Sometimes people will want the crown replaced for aesthetic reasons as it may not look very nice or natural when the margin does not go to the gum line. Best to ask your dentist to fully explain what the problem is with the current crown and why replacing is necessary.
      Sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  43. I had my back lower left molar crowned a year an a half ago because the filling was old and deteriorating and there was a slight crack in the back of the molar. Prior to having the tooth crowned, I had no pain. Following the crown, I had pain that persisted, and I always felt like the bite was off. I returned to my dentist multiple times for adjustments. Both dentists in the practice continued to check my bite. The articulating paper looked perfect to them. I began to become more sore and sensitive to hot and cold in my top teeth as well as the bottom teeth near the crowned back molar. My dentist sent me to an endodontist. The endodontist said that a root canal would not help, but that the crown looked high on the sides. The endodontist shaved the crown down significantly, and I had immediate relief; however, the crown, which had never been permanently cemented due to the problems, became loose. After a month of finally feeling normal and eating for the first time in over a year on the left side, the crown came off. I returned to my regular dentist who permanently cemented the crown in place. The dentist did not alter the crown which finally was comfortable after the endodontist shaved it. Now, my bite feels off again and I have soreness in my upper teeth on the left side. I returned to my dentists and told them that the bite was off again. They checked with the articulating paper and told me that my bite looked perfect. What do you suggest? I am so disappointed that I have discomfort again.

    Reply
    • Hello Ellen
      There are a couple of possibilites…one is that when the crown was recemented it did not seat all the way. Although possible it should be easy to see and verify by your dentist. Second adjusting the crown may have taken the tooth out of occlusion, in which case a tooth can and will overerupt and begin to make contact again. Third it may be that your dentist is looking at your centric contacts only…it is not uncommon to miss some contact areas that occur as we chew, which are more on the cusp slopes/inclines. Your centric bite may be perfect, but if you make a heavy contact on the inclines as you chew it will cause a torquing motion in the tooth and this is what may be causing discomfort.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  44. Dear Dr Balogh

    I am 61, female. I had a lower back molar removed right side last September 2018 as it was very loose and dentist said it could affect other teeth if left. I didn’t know I had a problem as there was no pain and I didn’t realise it was loose but it was as my dentist could move it around. It was a wisdom tooth that grew in the space where I’d had a previous molar removed as a child, so now I only have my first molar left of the 3 molars on right lower jaw, I have all my other teeth. In January I had a crown fitted to my upper right 2nd molar and it felt very tight in the space between teeth on either side. Since then the new crown kept twinging and the gum on outside appears slightly swollen. My dentist said it would settle down. The crown looks great but 6 months later I went back as waking up with toothache upper and lower right side, CT scan has been taken and shows the cushion between my upper and lower jaw R side has decreased and I get pain in jaw and into ear and neck stiffness when I chew. ? now have tmj but would this cause my teeth to ache.

    I am wondering if the crown that feels tightly wedged in between my upper wisdom tooth and first molar is the cause of the pain if it is too tight between the other teeth. Do you think I should ask my dentist to take this crown off and try and temporary to see if things improve. Many thanks for any advice. Thank you.

    Reply
    • The gum tissue should not be swollen in the long term…if it still is then something more is going on. If the pressure and gum is OK, have your dentist check your bite carefully especially as you grind from side to side. If there are any contacts in excursions (side to side movements) then it could trigger some tmj issues as well as tooth sensitivity.
      Sincerely
      Dr balogh

      Reply
  45. I have a bridge on the top left (molars). A few months ago,There was decay under one of the attached teeth, so the bridge was cut off and the decay was cleaned and now I have a new bridge. Since the new bridge was put in, I have had pain when I chew and sensitivity to cold. My dentist adjusted the bite, but I still have the same symptoms and seem to be getting worse. What can be done? I hope I don’t need to remove this bridge?

    Reply
    • Hello Nalani:
      The cold sensitivity can be quite common and will often go away with time. However the bite sensitivity could be a result of simply working on the tooth (in which case it will also go away with time), it could be due to the bite (in which case your dentist did the right thing by checking and adjusting your bite), and unfortunately it could be an indication that the nerve has become irreversibly affected by all that has happened to the tooth (past fillings, 2 bridges, and bacteria from decay) in which case the tooth may need a root canal. Usually the bridge will not have to be removed or replaced…your dentist can make a small hole in the biting surface to gain access to the pulp/nerve, complete the root canal and then seal it hole with a permanent filling. The bridge will still be fine and last for many years.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  46. Dear Dr. Balogh,
    I have a similar problem to Monica’s above in that I feel no pain from the crowns but feel considerable discomfort, which is extremely distracting. The dentist of course says that I will adjust, but I am not convinced because this is not the first time these crowns cause me discomfort. These are three crowns fitted on implants replacing molars on the left side, one in the upper jaw and two in the lower jaw. The first time they were fitted, all three felt huge and even looked too large; they were filed twice to make them smaller, but they still felt uncomfortable. In the meantime, I realized gradually that the upper and lower crowns had little contact and I still chewed on the other side. That was confirmed by the dentist and new crowns were ordered. The weeks that I was without these crowns were heaven – the discomfort and the distraction were temporarily gone. Now I am wearing the new crowns for a few days and they do have contact, but although somewhat smaller, again they feel bulky and distracting, like foreign objects and not like my own teeth, in the way of the tongue. I have a few older implants on the other side, which feel like my own teeth and never caused any problems, so I know how implants should feel and behave.

    That said, I am one on these “princesses on a pea” unfortunately, but knowing this does not solve these types of problems; they are still bothersome even if the objective reasons are minimal. In this case, I think that the crowns are still larger than my natural teeth, they are probably “out of line” in the back compared to where my own teeth were and the implants may angle in such a way that the crowns are tilted inwards more than the teeth did. But, the lab says that they cannot make the crowns any smaller, because of the opening in the middle (too small a crown could break as a result, they say). And of course changing the tilt of a well integrated implant is not feasible. If the discomfort does not go away, what options do I have, other than praying to St. Apollonia, the patroness of people with dental problems? Thank you so much for your response.

    Reply
    • Hello Lucy:

      since you had no issues when the crowns were removed my first thought is that it has something to do with the bite. Question…when yo bite on your back teeth, what we call your centric bite, does it feel like the other teeth or are you hitting the implant crowns first or harder. Then as you slide from side to side from that position, do you make contact with those teeth?

      It may be that your dentist has adjusted your centric bite but there may be some heavy contacts on the slopes of the teeth. As we move from side to side we should not touch the slopes of the back teeth….we should feel contact in the front, usually the canine tooth only. I personally have had patients with a similar situations where I could not see any heavy contacts per se, and at the same time not been able to identify any other issues with the teeth. On a whim (or more likely an inner spiritual prompting) I made some adjustments on the slopes of the teeth and surprisingly the patients found their symptoms gone.

      I have learned the hard way that sometimes what we see with our eyes and what we think is OK, may not be the case.

      Now I cannot say for sure that the bite is the problem with your teeth, however the is the first thing that has to be eliminated. Another possibility is one of the implants is not as fully integrated as it appears. This could be verified by using special instruments to objectively measure the implant stability (Ostell is one particular brand/insturment)

      Hope this helps a little…have your dentist check your bite in lateral excursions.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  47. I am a 55 year old dental patient with several very old amalgam restorations from childhood.
    My teeth underwent changes following pregnancy at 25. At age 35 I had my first root canal and crown (upper right rear molar) by a dentist I knew and trusted that with whom I’d gone to high school, and he made me plastic whitening trays as a gift to celebrate my weight loss following gastric bypass before he moved from our hometown. I also had sinus surgery soon afterward. At 38 several amalgams were replaced with tooth colored fillings and a dental dam was used, leaving only 4 amalgam fillings in place. I became aware of the potential problems of mercury. At 43 I moved to Hawaii and while assisting with a friend’s bakery business ate a scone and an upper right molar next to the last molar literally crumbled. I went to a dentist he used who restored the tooth with a “peg” and crown, but without without a root canal. At 47 a bottom left molar next to the back molar broke and by then living in another area I went to the dentist a friend in that area used. This female dentist was very kind but had trouble even getting the needle accurately placed to numb the quadrant. The VERY large filling restoration with a “liner” was of poor quality or inaccurate choice, the height of the front cusp was too low, the restoration cracked just above the gum line, and I continued to have problems. She confessed she was trying to save me money and avoid a root canal and crown. Wrong call. She did not discuss the options but made the choice for me. I did not have funds to pay for a second corrected restoration. I’ve struggled for years with pressure/temperature/air sensitivity until finally pushed by pain to have it corrected now at 55. The dentist I got into now also stated there were two cavities in the two teeth next to the problem tooth that needed filling, and doing so at the same time as the crown would allow him to address them from the side rather than from the top down. I prioritized making sure we adequately addressed the historically problem tooth. He filled the two neighboring teeth and prepped the problem tooth for a crown. He also used the drill to grind down the gum significantly “exposed enough tooth to attach the crown, leaving a tunnel I can whistle through. The result is that the neighboring bicuspid forward of the crown prepped molar is now sensitive and loose. I do not know if this is a result of grinding down the gum, if it will get better, or if it will tighten back up. Moreover the permanent crown was delivered today and that molar is still experiencing sensitivity. We looked at the xray so he could show me the depth of the restoration to nerve proximity. I saw what looked like a fracture of the tooth root. He agreed to temporarily cement the permanent crown so I can give the gum more time to heal, seeing if the sensitivity and loosening resolve before making a decision about a root canal. I was disturbed that he wanted to grind down an upper tooth to resolve the lower bicuspid loosening origin, when I believe it was a problem from the temporary crown not being high enough, (as the permanent is) and before the permanent crown placement. Moreover I am disturbed by the preparation of the molar and appearance of this crown. The two previous crowns completely encircled each tooth initially meeting tightly at the gum line. I have never had problems with either of them. This new crown has a “box” on the lingual surface and does not totally encase the tooth nor meet at the gum line. I fear additional decay in a badly damaged problematic tooth at a lingual surface that will be very difficult and expensive to address in the future. This crown does not have the telltale metal edge banding or inner surface of the prior two. And my tongue constantly goes to the resulting ridge between the crown and the natural tooth. And the whistle wind tunnel that I thought would be minimized by the permanent crown was not.

    My questions: Has crown dentistry changed? Is this a better application? Is this a different crown? If so is it the right crown for a molar with heavy duty chewing chores? If this is not asthetically what I want, what are my options and how should I handle this?

    Reply
    • Hello Beverly:

      You bring up a lot of different issues in your letter. In my 30 years experience I would say every generation has seen improvement in their dental work from the 1950s and onward. Based on your age you’re fortunate enough to have kept most of your teeth whereas our parents typically lost all their teeth and had dentures. today’s younger generation not only have can you keep their teeth many have had very few filings or cavities. So I am making a rather big assumption that you not only had many feelings that many of these feelings were quite large and possibly deep period

      If so it’s not unusual that these teeth after many years need either crowns and/or root canals and in some cases even gum surgery to provide enough to work with. It does sound like summer your dentist have tried to hi Jew with the best care possible and yet same time be conservative wrt costs and the type of treatment they’re recommending.

      One of your concerns is that you have a new crown which is short of the gum line. This is not an entirely new as whenever we can keep a margin away from the gum line it is usually healthier not only for the gums but also easier to clean, and hence less likely to cause a cavity at the gum line or margin of the Crown. Of course we break this rule whenever esthetics are involved but typically on the lingual surface if possible we try to keep the crown margin just short of gumline.

      The issue of the space between the teeth at the gum line and the whistling of wind or air between the teeth maybe a result of having to shorten the gums and/or bone loss or gum disease in that area. Sometimes the crown can be modified to close that space and without seeing the situation I’m having to guess it makes several assumptions. It would be best to speak to your dentist about it and see if he or she can still do something close that space.

      As far as the looseness of the tooth could be that the bike needs to be adjusted or it may be that this tooth does not have the same amount of bonus that used to in the past. Once again without seen situation either clinically or via x-rays it is really hard to give you accurate information

      . Overall the best thing to do to speak to dentist about your concerns. Since your dentist cemented the crown with a temporary cement it may be possible to have this removed and sent back to laboratory to make some changes…. This is also something you should discuss with your dentist

      I’m sorry that I couldn’t be more helpful but I hope this at least gives you some peace and reassurance
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  48. I removed my old crown and got a new one. The dentist take once my impression and then did resolved other problems. He taken for the second time an impression, and reajusted the tooth for the crown by modify a little the appearence. He asked me to come and probe my crown. The problem is that the crown had been made by the first impression taken. Now i think that the crown is not so well fitted. He did a test with something inside to see how much filling is needed and then cimented it. Is there a problem if the cement is in a little too much coat? Is better if there is more or less cement in a crown?

    Reply
    • Hello Helen:

      Ideally a crown should not have a lot of cement but more importantly is how well does it fit at the margins, and is there still enough tooth and is the shape of the tooth, fit of the crown sufficient to retain/hold the crown. All of these things need to be determined and assessed clinically…it is impossible to say whether the crown you have is now OK or insufficient…but you certainly could ask your dentist the same question.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  49. Hello,
    A year ago I had my upper back tooth filling corner crack off and was recommended to get a crown. Because of the location and the work involved my jaw was sore for several days and subsequently had 6 bite adjustments over the next couple of months as I couldn’t chew on that tooth. I left Canada and went to the US for the winter and started having throbbing pain taking antiinflammatory meds and antibiotics and was not chewing on that side of my mouth or sleeping on that side. Eventually 7 months later needed a root canal which I had in the US. It is now 6 months later and a year since the crown and I still am totally sensitive to chewing on the tooth and won’t sleep or lie on that side of my face. If I press my finger into my cheek I can feel the tooth. I’ve had the bite checked again and the dentist says it is fine. The tooth next to the crown/root canal has sensitivity as well and I’m still not biting on the tooth. If I get a seed over to that side of the mouth and chew on it I can feel it immediately. My Endodontist who is board certified and was the best in town apparently said he has had patients who have taken 6 months to settle from a root canal. It is now 6 months and I’m not settled. Could it be that given the intense pain and long period of time waiting to have the crown settled which lead to the root canal that my teeth are taking an exceptional amount of time to settle? I’m worried that the slight irrational to the tooth next to the crown will lead to that tooth needing work. COULD it be that the crown has been adjusted so many times that the teeth next to it are now sensitive as they are taking more of the bite than they used to take and need to be adjusted now? Have you had patients that simply take 6+ months to settle from a crown/root canal? There have been xrays taken and both the dentist and endodontist have looked at those and say everything looks really good.

    Thank you … possibly I’m the real princess when it comes to tooth issues.

    Laurenne

    Reply
    • Hello Laurenne:

      Some teeth do take time to settle down. However here are a couple of other possibilities to investigate:

      Your dentist may have adjusted and confirmed that your bite is good in centric (in other words your “normal” bite as you close on your back teeth). However you may have some contact on the cusp slopes…these will show up as you slide from side to side. In dentistry we call them interferences and on working contacts. It could be that all these contacts are indeed good, yet as you eat or possbily clench or grind your teeth, they still make heavy contact…that is because the lower jaw can flex on heavy biting. Most dentists may not be aware of this or if they have, may not have actually seen or experienced this with their patients….I had practiced fro 20 years before I truly saw and understood how much this can occur. Lastly you may have a fracture in the tooth root. Although you experienced a broken cusp at first, you may have also had a crack in the root itself. This could have been the underlying problem which led to sensitivity, and then subsequent root canal and then continued sensitivity. Thes cn be very difficult to identify except in the later stages of tooth failure. A 3d image (ct scan) would be helpful at the time if all these other things I mentioned above have truly been ruled out and there are no other things identified.
      I hope this helps you and your dentists a bit.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  50. I got my new crown about an hour , it’s probably in my head but I don’t think it fits right . This might seem disgusting but whenever i’m nervous I bite my lip and sometimes take skin off . Well since i’ve gotten it , I haven’t been able to . Maybe I should let it settle for a couple of days since i’ve it’s gotten it and see .

    Reply
    • It is not unusual for a new crown to feel a little odd, tight or even big…however it definitely should not feel “too tall”…that might indicate the bite is too high. Because you can no longer bite your lip the length/size/zhap might be a bit different than your original tooth. This may not be a problem or big issue unless there is some other esthetic or functional issue

      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  51. Today is Saturday 9pm. This past Wednesday I had a Temp. crown cemented on to #11 tooth., by a new dentist, as my old Dentist 78 retired. I had this same tooth break in 2017, and my previous dentist replaced the K-9 within 2 hours, as he had the new 3-D machine, to make the new crown at the one visit. This #11 temp crown has a perfect “bite”, but today, 4 days latter, the temp crown seems to be sticking out, (bucktooth) rubbing my upper lip. Wednesday the new dentist said the permanent Crown should be back in 2 weeks. Should I phone him the 1st of next week, and ask him to phone the Lab, to HOLD-OFF on making that Crown, untiI am sure my mouth becomes comfortable with this LARGE Tem. crown. I feel that within 2 weeks this Temp. crown should feel normal, otherwise I would think it better to remove this temp, or grind down smaller, then take a new impression to send to the lab, to use to make the NEW crown. Thanks for any advice!

    Reply
    • Hi Bill

      The new crown may not be a problem unless the dentist took a mold or image and asked the lab to use the temp crown as a guide to the size and shape. If so then in my opinion it would be better to modify the temp till you are happy and comfortable. IN the alternative scenario, the lab will make the tooth based on the model and how your teeth fit together on the models. This is usually satisfactory however if there is any doubt ask your dentist about cementing the crown with temporary cement for short while so you can confirm the fit/function/esthetics etc before inserting it permanently
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  52. Hello, I had a root canal done one month ago on my front tooth, they put a temp on and everything felt fine no pain. I went for my permanent crown, and upon putting it in it felt very odd, kind of tight and like it was putting pressure on my tooth from inside. I figured I just needed to get used to it, but it has been three weeks and it still feels like pressure when I push on it or bite into something, it’s not really painful just mild pain mostly pressure. My dentist checked my bite and it’s fine he thinks I should give it more time to heal, is this normal after three weeks. Can it be adjusted from the inside of the crown to fit better?

    Reply
    • Hello Mia

      The temp crown is often made a little light in biting contact, whereas the final crown is in full contact. That cold explain why the temp was perfect yet the final crown was sensitive. Some root canal teeth do take time to settle. If the bite is high that could be checked and the crown adjusted if necessary. the bite is the first issue that needs to b ruled out. However if there is no improvement as time goes one you should follow up with your dentist
      Sincerely
      dr balogh

      Reply
  53. First off, thank you for your time and advice given.

    My issue may be similar to others, but I’ll describe it in detail nonetheless. I had my permanent crown installed yesterday (lower jaw, right side, first molar). The temporary crown fit great, and I never noticed it, but the permanent crown seems to have thrown off the balance or alignment of the jaws and bite. All I do now is notice that my bite never feels natural or “at peace”. I can move between two positions, but there is pressure against teeth in both cases. The only relief is keeping the jaws separated and not making contact, but that doesn’t seem smart or healthy.

    Looking at the crown in a mirror, one edge of the crown (paralleling the tongue) seems to have peaks or raised edges that are higher than the overall level of the teeth. Maybe that is interfering.

    I have to wait through the weekend to go back to the dentist, and do hope to get some resolution / adjustment.

    Reply
    • Hello Jim
      Sorry for the late reply…for some reason your question did not show up on previous posts. It sounds like your bite is off and needs to be adjusted. Have your dentist place some occlusal paper between your teeth and then rub on the areas that you feel your teeth hitting. This should identify the areas that need adjusting.
      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply
  54. Hello,
    I am 20 years old and my natural upper front teeth were extremely crooked since I refused to get braces when I was a child. One month ago, my dentist pulled two teeth (on the left side there was a tooth just at the back of another, it was almost on my palate), shaved the others and did root canal treatment. I used a temporary bridge while waiting the huge hole to heal. Three days ago, I got my permanent bridge (a full bridge consisting of several crowns) cemented. The overall look is perfect, and I think my bite is okay, but the problem is that only one tooth feels and looks too thick on its back. (the replacement of the tooth which had another one on its back). Now, all I can focus is the feeling of that one bulky tooth. My tongue keeps touching it and it’s really really disturbing, like keeping a little object in my mouth all the time. I asked my dentist to file the back of that tooth to reduce its thickness, but she insists she can’t for several reasons. She says that firstly they are metal fused porcelains, it’s risky to file them. Second, it has to have that thickness to support the rest of the bridge. And lastly since the structure of my mouth is crooked, it’s not possible for all my teeth have the same thickness. She thinks I’ll get used to it within a month. Actually she persuaded me, but I am still fearing that I’ll never get used to it. Plus, the letters t and s are problematic for me at the moment. Is there really no way to adjust that one teeth even a little bit? And what if I never get used to it? Should I see another dentist? I really would like to know all my options. Thank you in advance for any help you may be able to provide.

    Reply
    • Hello Melissa

      your dentist may be correct in that she cannot trim the tooth without compromising the strength of the porcelain/bridge. Also with a little time many do get accustomed to a new shape, although it may take several weeks. Alternatively would be to move the teeth with braces to a more ideal position first and then have the bridge made….in that way the teeth will be amore ideal; size and shape

      Sincerely
      Dr Balogh

      Reply

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